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20121201
20121231
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CURRENT 19
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the unions that built that state. that built the middle class. that built this amazing country. someone, please tell me what are we becoming? >> jennifer: tonight we're going to go straight to the state of michigan where more than 10,000 protestors descended on lansing, the capitol to raise their voices against harsh new anti-labor laws. >> right to work has got to go! >> he wants to turn us around make $10 an hour, what are we going to do for our families? >> jennifer: preach it, sir. despite the uproar outside the capitol, inside it, the republican-led legislature still passed right-to-work legislation today. that legislation would muzzle the union voice in michigan by taking away the requirement that everyone who's in a union shop should pay union dues. you might ask why is that a big deal. well if not everyone's required to pay you're going to have people who enjoy the advantages of a union better pay and better benefits environment but who don't contribute to the union's survival at all. this only works if we're all
[♪ theme music ♪] >>> i'm michael shure. tonight in "the war room," union busting, arrests, the coach brothers, the president, it seems michigan has a little something for everyone these days. [♪ theme music ♪] insicuderr "the war room," i'm michael shure sitting in for jennifer granholm. tonight the fight rages on in michigan. the new front line for the battle for worker's rights in this country. the uaw is founded there, but republican lawmakers are now threatening to cripple it there. this is pure and simple union busting. these right to work laws have already had serious impacts across the country. wages for all workers, unionized and otherwise have decreased an average of $1,500 a year and workers are less likely to get health insurance or pensions. during the campaign any president voiced strong support the unions but as we know campaigning a very different from governing. things didn't look too promising this morning. so let's let the president speak for himself on this one. here he is in red ford, michigan late this afternoon. >> obama: what
start picking a fight with michigan union workers. [ music ] >> this is a fight for the survival of labor unions and the american middle class they support. just minutes ago, the michigan house of representatives passed the so-called "right to work bill." it passed 58 to 52. six republicans voted know, but the bill passed. and believe me if they can do this in michigan they can do it anywhere in the country. it gives new meaning to the term "lame-duck session." the bill basically eviscerates bargaining. it's a move to cut off the resources that give labor unions their strength. in addition to people funding, we have seen this work before. there is no doubt what's going on here. it is a war on unions. it is a war on the democratic party. today, a lansing state journal photographer captured this video as waves of union sportupporters and police flooded the state capitol trying to stop the bill. the capitol was locked down. police say they arrested eight people inside, and even used a chemical spray to regain control control. outside, union supporters mar
part to the strength of its labor unions and the large number of manufacturing workers living in flint. they took over a factory and they didn't leave until they reached a deal with management. workers occupied several general motor's plants. not for a day, a week but for month -- actually for longer than a month for 40-consecutive days and it worked. they got bargaining rights, and 40-hour workweek and a minimum wage. they had 100,000 people turned out in detroit to show their support for the striking workers in flint 100,000 people. and yesterday, 12,000 people turned out in lancing, michigan to protest against the state's new right to work law. it's a devastating blow to the heart of organized labor in this country, and perhaps no one knows more about than that that garl dean blankinship. >> my father called home one night, he was working on the second shift. he said we're on strike. it's a sitdown. i'll be home when it is over. and he was 44 days later. let's not let the beatings that they took and everything else they did go to waste. >> thank you! >> j
for the minimum wage to be raised to $15 an hour. for the right to unionize without interference. they would be a powerful force. fast food workers are the fourth largest occupation in the country! they earn on average about $18,000 a year. for full time. that's roughly the poverty level for a family of three. at the same time, these big chains are reporting record profits. and the issue underscores a fundamental, moral question. will we build an economy that pays workers enough to support a family or will we use the government to subsidize people's wages through food stamps and other support. today, we're not doing either one. in michigan, i signed a bill to raise the minimum wage to $7.40 an hour. that was six years ago. it needs to be raised again. the federal minimum wage is lower than that. it is now just $7.25 an hour. try, just try imagine earning $7.25 an hour and paying a mortgage or rent try living on $7.25 an hour and buying food, much less acquiring transportation in some way. forget clothing. tha
floors were engulfed in flames but the doors were padlocked shut reportedly to stop union ortion from entering. so the workers inside couldn't get out. on the streets below crowds gathered and firemen stood by helplessly, their ladders too short to reach the top floors. historian robert caro describes the scene in a pbs documentary. >> someone said they must be throwing -- it was burning as it fell. they must be throwing out the burning bails of clothes. and then other bodies started to come down. people realized, even young girls would go out on the ledge. the flames would be loom up behind them and they jumped, of course to die. tried to cling to the ledge with their fingertips but they couldn't. you have plummeting down to the street scores of burning dead bodies. >> jennifer: in all 145 workers were killed. after that there were major changes to labor laws. new york created a factory investigating commission to look at safety rules and regulations. it identified 200 other factories with similar conditions. it
starting at 1 eastern. on current tv. >>taking advantage of the strength of the coca grower union structure has allowed them to reduce coca beyond the cato for each family. er, in a peaceful negotiated way. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. i want the people who watch our show, to be able to come away armed with the facts, and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them, you're put on this planet for something more. i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action themselves. as
going to put some stuff in his state of the union. what do you expect to come out of the task force? >> the president said a lot of good things, and it's fantastic, by the way that he chose vice president biden who is about as smart on these issues and as attuned to law enforcement as anybody in government. but we think the first and best thing you can do is make sure everybody gets a background check. right now something like 40 to 50% of people who buy guns may not get a background check because you only have to do that approximate you go to a licensed dealer, smart criminals know that, so they go to the internet, back of somebody's car, or a gun show. so that was a very smart move. second he said we ought to find a way to get assault weapons off of our streets. we agree. we think the last ban didn't have everything you would want. we're trying look at a bill that you would pass that would be stronger and less easy to evade. and also high-capacity magazines, which keep turning up at these increasingly horrific mass shootings. >> jennifer: yeah, we just had jack
from our far right wing friends? arm the teachers. the very teaches they've called union thugs. we should pay to train these teachers. the people who scream us to about fast and furious and said gun proliferation and mexico was dangerous are still telling us gun proliferation in america makes us safer. welcome to the u.s.a. where of some you will find it's easier to buy a weapon designed to kill a lot of people in a short amount of time than it is to marry who you love or vote where you want or send your kids to kindergarten. we now live in a society where the aurora, colorado, shooter could buy 6,000 rounds of ammo online and tommy chung went to jail for selling bombs. it is painfully obvious... we need change in this country! and the good news, the majority of americans and the majority of gun owners agree. in fact, a new ppp poll finds that the majority of americans and the majority of gun owners support banning assault weapons and closing the gun show loophole. but the nra opposes both of those measures and in
municipal workers and unions and endowments and other institutions and individuals." it seems like money talks afterall. at least in the world of private equity. now california state treasurer bill lockyer has asked the states' two largest pension funds, the teacher's pension fund and the california public employees retirement system which is the biggest pension fund in the entire country he's asked them to purge their portfolios of gun manufacturers if their products are illegal in california. for the latest on the story, i'm so pleased to be able to welcome inside "the war room," california state treasurer bill lockyer joining us by telephone from hayward california. bill, thank you for being here. hello again after many years. >> jennifer: for our viewers we served together as attorneys general and bill has served in many public positions. now as treasurer he's responsible for a very big portfolio and so how much money bill are we talking about with both of these funds? >> well, altogether, we're talking about $40
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)